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Future Food Salons


Voyage to Anthropocene 2018–20

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Future Food Salons


Voyage to Anthropocene 2018–20

 

The Future Food SalonS explore AND CELEBRATE what we will be eating in the future.

Future Food Salons are collaborative happenings hosted by Alimentary's Aruna Antonella Handa with members of the Future Food Salon Group and local partners. Bringing together artists, scientists, inventors, makers, farmers, chefs and surprises, the Salons welcome everyone curious about what we might be eating in the future.

There is a new sense of urgency with the recent publication of the IPCC Report urging us to cap global warming at 1.5C above pre-industrial temperatures. Canada is on target for a 4C rise, and the US for a 5C rise. The Future Food Salons are designed to lay the foundation for collaborating, identifying, disseminating and celebrating innovative options for feeding future generations. Please join us in the CDR Food Lab as we endaavour to leverage human ingenuity to create Carbon Negative Food Production.

 Please click to explore this Salon currently in development.

Please click to explore this Salon currently in development.

WATCH THIS SPACE: ON WORLD FOOD DAY
OCTOBER 16, 2018.

We’ll be launching materials to assist artists, thinkers and tinkers to explore the possibilitities of fungi in the context of food and the Anthropocene. Please get in touch if you’d lke to join this Salon as a guest or as a maker.

 

FUTURE FOOD SALONS PAST

Toronto: Centre for Social Innovation (2011) Gallery 345 (2013)
New York: Centre for Social Innovation NY (2013) The Explorers Club (2015)
Austin: Brazos Hall (2014)
Montreal: Insectarium / Botanical Gardens (2014)

Related Future Food Salon Events

Toronto: Victory Café Bugs & Beer (2013), CSI Annex: Taste Lab: Bugs (2013)
Montreal: Insectarium / Botanical Gardens Big Bang Bug Banquet (2014)
New York: The Explorers Club Banquet of Bugs (2015)

Take off with us?

Journey from the future back in time to the Anthropocene aboard the time travel cruise ship and see what the planet did to rescue itself from the brink of ecological disaste

VOYAGE TO THE ANTHROPOCENE:
FUTURE FOOD SALON 3

The Future Food Salons anticipate the official announcement of the new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. Humankind has now become the greatest geological force on Planet Earth. Though the signs can be read as markers of despair, the Salon encourages a vision of opportunity, of hope, of challenge to inspire us to break free of our dependence on destructive materials and invent ways to showcase the very best of humankind in the Anthropocene.

Fungi including mushrooms, yeasts, moulds and smuts is the featured ingredient with algae, insects playing supporting roles. Fungi, being the planet’s experts in waste management can lead the way to remediation. We need to pay attention.

Everything (or nearly) in this Salon will be alive: live music composed for this salon, fungi textiles, fungi art, living sculpture, live canapés of future foods, live cocktails and more.

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Future Food Salonnière


Aruna Antonella Handa

Future Food Salonnière


Aruna Antonella Handa

Multimedia artist Dr. Aruna Antonella Handa is the founding Salonnière of the Future Food Salons. She draws her inspiration from the Salonnières of the past, especially those who started the ‘movement’ in Italy, in their boudoirs, inviting philosophers, poets and musicians to come enlighten audiences of women, who were barred entry to the hallowed halls of learning. A modern day salonnière, Aruna invites artists, chefs, farmers, inventors, poets, musicians and anyone whose currency is imagination to join her in the explorations of the future of food, the tasty and the taboo. Her performance art and multimedia experiences in the future of food are research-based, drawing on her doctorate in philosophy, her experiences as theatre director, her work as a composer, musician and curator, her extensive travel as food explorer, and her creations as artist, musician and cook. A sensualist, she refuses to compromise taste on the altar of sustainability, and has never been compelled to eshew flavour in pursuit of the common good. Carbon negative everything is on her mind these days.
Dr. Handa is a subject-area expert in the future of food and in entomophagy. This year, she was a featured future food expert in the award-winning 2018 documentary, The Gateway Bug. Currently, she is composing new music and songs for Voyage to Anthropocene, continuing research of carbon negative food, developing new recipes for the Salon, and gathering the players and works for the third series of the Salons and its inaugural school programs.

Painting: Salon de dames, Abraham Bosse c. 1643
Photo credit: Jan Keck

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Salon featured food


Fungi, Algae, Bugs

Salon featured food


Fungi, Algae, Bugs

 

 PHILOSOPHY OF FOOD
We adore the aesthetics of food, as well as sustainability and nutrition. We prefer local, organic, and aim for zero waste. We collaborate with chefs, cooks and companies, who share our sensibilities. In preparation, we research and work closely with chefs including local ones in the host city to create a menu that amuses palates and stimulates imaginations. This series, we are aiming a little higher, or rather lower, in that our goal is carbon negative food creation. What that means and the myriad of ways to accomplish this will form the work of this series. We think we have a lot to learn from fungi, which are, after all, nature’s waste management experts.

WHY FUNGUS?
We are featuring fungi for many reasons: ease of cultivation, ease of distribution, long shelf life when dried, versatility, fermentation possibilities, range of flavours and textures, nutrition. We are also impressed with their suitability for interplanetary travel and colonization, their abilities to grow on and consume waste and their plasticity as a construction material, whether textiles or bricks. Perhaps the most important reason for selecting fungi is that they are the planet’s expert waste managers. It is nearly magic what this third kingdom can do with plain old garbage, not just biological waste matter. We need to pay attention and learn. Fast.

 

SOME CHEFS OF PREVIOUS SALONS
Chef Mario Hernandez, Black Ant Restaurant, NYC
Chef David Ali Garcia, Límon, Montreal
Pastry chef Felix “Urban Chef NYC” Castro, New York.
Natalia “Cookie” Martinez, Toronto
Chef Nathan Isberg, Toronto
Cook Caravan, Montreal
Chef Sonia Coté, Austin
David George “The Bug Chef” Gordon, Seattle

SOME FOOD START-UPS OF PAST SALONS
Micronutris, Toulouse, France
Jimini Crickets, Paris, France
Roll Your Own Sushi, Austin, Texas
Critters Bitters, New York
Cricket Flours, Portland, Oregon
Chapul Cricket Bars, Salt Lake City, Utah
Exo Bars, NY, NY
Third Millennium Farms, Toronto
Gourmex, Inc. Oaxaca, Mexico, Montreal.
uKa Proteine, Montreal

photo: yellow oyster mushroom, Jean Beaufort. 

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Chefs


Natalia “Cookie” Martinez
Felix “Urban Chef” Castro

Chefs


Natalia “Cookie” Martinez
Felix “Urban Chef” Castro

Natalia “Cookie” Martinez, chef
Future Food Salons 2013-Present

Natalia “Cookie” Martinez was born and raised in Colombia. For the past ten years, she has lived and worked in Toronto, Canada where she founded her company, Cookie Martinez. When she received her first cookbook from her home country of Colombia, she felt very inspired. The recipes and photographs transported her to her childhood in Colombia to a time when her mother and godmother frequently delighted the family with their expert baking.

“My creations are inspired from tastes of my childhood in Colombia with organic and locally sourced ingredients. I have developed several recipes using crickets for the Future Food Salons in Toronto, New York and Montreal. Following those salons, I have had the opportunity to host insect meals, to offer insect catering and to sell some of my insect creations from my food container in Toronto, at Dundas and Bathurst Streets.

For this Salon, I am excited to bring some Colombian fermented specialties—given that yeast is a fungi—to the Salon and to continue working with agar agar, dulse and some of my favourite seaweeds and algae. I’m excited about the challenge to create live food, as much as possible. Fans of the wood mushroom pickle we made in New York for the Explorers Club may see a new version of that too. All my food is made by hand, with a Latin twist.

 Natalia “Cookie” Martinez, Toronto.

Natalia “Cookie” Martinez, Toronto.


 

FELIX “URBAN CHEF” CASTRO
FUTURE FOOD SALON CHEF 2015-PRESENT

 Chef Felix Castro, New York.

Chef Felix Castro, New York.

Felix Castro joined the Future Food Salons in New York in 2015 at the Explorers Club on the upper east side, where he created bug-desserts for the sit down dinner and canapés for the cocktail reception. A leader in innovative food creation and dedicated to minimizing waste, Felix is excited about the new brief for Voyage to Anthropocene focussing on fungi, algae and bugs.

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Born and raised in Brooklyn, Pastry Chef Felix Castro grew up in a large Latin family with a deep love of food. At the young age of 16, Felix began working in a family owned pizzeria and developed an intense passion and curiosity for the culinary arts. Realizing the harder he worked, the more he learned and the more passionate he became about cooking, Felix enrolled in the Culinary Academy of New York while working a full time job. Finding his love and talent for pastry, Felix was determined to learn more and enrolled in the Patisserie Program at Le Cordon Bleu in San Francisco where he graduated with high honours.

After returning to New York City, Felix worked in the kitchens at Morimoto, Spice Market, The 21 Club, Post House and The Hurricane Club. After being introduced to world renowned pastry guru Pichet Ong, Felix was hired as the Executive Pastry Chef of Pichet’s downtown hotspot, Spot Dessert. Felix also created and executed the pastry program for all three locations of Ong’s Qi Thai venture. Admiring Felix’s talents in pastry Pichet introduced him to restaurateur Julian Media and Felix quickly rose to oversee pastry operations for Coppelia, Yerba Buena and Toloache where he gained a following as a Pastry Chef and Ice cream artisan.

Chef Felix is currently the executive chef at Beetlehouse NYC which is owned by restaurateur Zach Neil . Zach later offered Felix a partnership in his latest venture called cakeshake, which is a traditional and vegan milk shake shop located at 514 East 6th st. There, Felix has created a beetlejuice-inspired shake called the showtime, which is garnished with Mexican grasshoppers.

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Fungi Fermenters


Salon ferments

Fungi Fermenters


Salon ferments

DIHAN CHANDRA, PRODUCER: BEER BREAD
THE SPENT GOODS COMPANY, TORONTO

 Dihan Chandra, at Henderson Brewery with a glass of Sourdough IPA in his hand. Spent grains from Henderson brewery are reclaimed and baked into Spent Good’s sourdough bread.

Dihan Chandra, at Henderson Brewery with a glass of Sourdough IPA in his hand. Spent grains from Henderson brewery are reclaimed and baked into Spent Good’s sourdough bread.

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In 2006, Dihan started his first social enterprise, Organic Lifestyle promoting and selling non-toxic alternatives for the home such as organic pillows, linens and mattresses. In 2017, Dihan launched The Spent Goods Company, and now runs both from his base in Toronto.

Focussing on bread and beer in his first product with Spent Goods, Dihan is partnering food waste with food companies who could remediate the spent grains of the brewing process. The spent grains in his first product, a sourdough, are primarily barley, used to make beer in Toronto’s Henderson’s Brewery Co. The grains are used undried in the sourdough bread recipe at the neighbouring bakery, The Drake Commissary. The resulting product is seriously delicious (my grandfather was a professional baker, my mother is a home baker as am I…this bread is truly scrumptious). Dihan’s company also produces a delightfully crispy lavash with 30% spent grains. The newest offering is a sandwich loaf.

Yeast is, of course, a fungi. And fungi are the planet’s expert waste managers as well as fermenters, so we could say that Dihan is practising a form of biomimicery in rescuing the spent grains from landfill and producing these breads and crackers. Dihan’s breads will be served in canapés and nude at the salon and he will also supply our chefs with spent grains for further experimental goodness.



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Art, Design, Installation


Chris Maurer, Architect
Kubo Dzamba, Designer
Rachel Kulick, Artist

Art, Design, Installation


Chris Maurer, Architect
Kubo Dzamba, Designer
Rachel Kulick, Artist

INTRODUCTION

Chris Maurer, Architect, Redhouse Studio is working with fungi-derived building materials in collaboration with NASA to design dome-like buildings that can ship as spores and then grow into building materials the red planet.

Kubo Dzamba, Designer, is innovating edible insect farming to create turnkey operations for would-be bug farmers. Eager to make carbon negative food production a reality, Kubo experiments with spent grains and other food waste to nourish the insects.

Learning how ancient cities and landscapes reacted to social stress and climate change that took place thousands of years ago motivates Rachel Kulick to explore and teach innovative methods in archaeology and environmental science that are relevant to fronting current challenges posed by urban growth and land development in the face of climate change.

CHRISTOPHER MAURER, architect, REDHOUSE, Ohio
future food salon 3 2018-2020.

 Christopher Maurer, Architect.

Christopher Maurer, Architect.

Working in limited-resource environments has inspired Christopher Maurer in his practice to reduce material inputs and leverage the building process to maximize impact and limit carbon footprint. In research, he is collaborating with leading researchers at NASA and MIT to develop and promote new “bioterials”, detailed to change the way we build and live. Christopher has also written open source material for both the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the Center for Architecture Foundation on sustainable building technologies. His recent work uses fungi technologies for both food production and building construction.

An architect, researcher, and humanitarian, Christopher has lived and worked as an architect in North America, Europe, and Africa. In North America, Christopher has worked in New York as director at studioMDA founded by Markus Dochantschi, protégé of Pritzer Prize winning architect Zaha Hadid. In Africa, Christopher was director of MASS Design Group where he designed and built many humanitarian projects for such clients as Madonna, Partners in Health, the UN Millennium Village Project, the Clinton Global Initiative, Jeff Gordon Children’s Foundation, and Noella Coursaris. Chris’s practice, Redhouse, is based in Cleveland, Ohio.

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 Redhouse Studio design for building on Mars using fungi and algae building materials.

Redhouse Studio design for building on Mars using fungi and algae building materials.


KUBO DZAMBA, ARCHITECT, THIRD MILLENNIUM FARMS, TORONTO
FUTURE FOOD SALON 2013-PRESENT

 Kubo Dzamba, Future Food Salon 2014 at the Eating Innovation conference, Space for Life Botanical Gardens & Insectarium, Montreal.

Kubo Dzamba, Future Food Salon 2014 at the Eating Innovation conference, Space for Life Botanical Gardens & Insectarium, Montreal.

At Third Millennium Farming we are eliminating the barriers of entry for new farmers through a toolkit of technologies, methods and support.

Our approach is to learn by doing. We develop everything at our 3200 square foot experimental urban farm and design studio in Toronto.

In the broadest sense Third Millennium Farming's mission is a common one. For many generations, the adults of this planet have been able to leave behind the promise of a brighter future to the youngest generation. By developing sustainable edible insect farming systems and technologies, we are fighting to ensure that our generation is able to hand over a healthy planet and brighter future to the next generation.

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Third Millennium Farming (3MF) specializes in developing edible insect farms, farming systems and technologies; with a particular focus on farming crickets. This allows us to offer our clients a full package of services for transforming their initial idea into reality. In that regard we are able to design cricket farming buildings, along with farming systems for breeding, growing and harvesting edible crickets. We are also able to provide turnkey modular cricket farming solutions, such as the Chirpbox (cutsheet available upon request).

Building a cricket farm, however, is only half of the challenge. Learning how to farm crickets, and to do so proficiently enough to run the farm feasibly, is the other half. To address these challenges head on, 3MF operates a 3,200 sqf urban edible cricket farm in Toronto, Ontario. The farm puts theory into practice by demonstrating superior densities of production (lbs/sqf), flexible production (for the feed and food market), and streamlining labour practices.

By distilling the hard lessons learned from operating an urban edible cricket farm, 3MF is able to provide its clients with on-demand support: from teaching new entrants how to farm crickets to assisting experienced farmers in boosting yields or troubleshooting unforeseen issues.


Dr. RACHEL KULICK, GeoArcheAologist and ARTIST, TORONTO
FUTURE FOOD SALON 3 2018–2020

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Rachel Kulick at Corinth, Greece, 2018. Photo: Annie Melton. (Research student Ms. Sam Hruban looks on.)

  Rachel Kulick at Palaikastro, Crete 2015.

Rachel Kulick at Palaikastro, Crete 2015.

Geoarchaeologist and artist Rachel Kulick, PhD (University of Toronto) studies how ancient cities and landscapes reacted to social stress and climate change that took place thousands of years ago. In her research, she uses microscopes, drone imagery, and other geological equipment to look at dirt and rocks from archaeological sites in order to reconstruct histories of the ancient landscapes and cities and develop narratives of the people who lived there. Understanding how people and environments responded to crisis situations and climate change over short and long timescales in the past provides insight to our current climate change crisis in the Anthropocene. 

Working with archaeologists, geologists, and other scientists, Rachel has contributed to new narratives on the Minoan civilization in Greece, which flourished some 5,000-3,000 years ago, and this work has been featured on PBS NOVA Next. Her current field work is funded by the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC) and explores sustainability and resilience at ancient cities on the Mediterranean islands of Crete (Greece) and Cyprus. 

Rachel also teaches innovative methods in archaeology and environmental science that are relevant to fronting current challenges posed by urban growth and land development in the face of climate change. Rachel is involved in Ontario public education as the Society for American Archaeology’s Ontario Provincial Education Coordinator. Rachel will be contributing to Voyage to the Anthropocene in the Schools program and as the Salon's Geoarchaeologist.

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The Musicians


ALLUVIAL PLAIN is creating V2A Songs for the Anthropocene

The Musicians


ALLUVIAL PLAIN is creating V2A Songs for the Anthropocene

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Performing material written for the dawning of the epoch of Anthropocene, ALLUVIAL PLAIN fuse jazz with Motown, country with punk, opera with pop, layering waves of vocal harmonies, lines of poetry on top of a wildly intuitive jazz rhythm section, creating a genre-defying thick, and agile acoustic sound. With a show of songs composed for “Voyage to the Anthropocene”, the band adds electronica and field recordings to bid farewell to the Holocene epoch and usher in the dawn of the Anthropocene.

Each member of this band is a sought-after soloist in their own right. When they come together to play, the result is as rare as fresh air.


Chris Adriaanse upright bass
Alejandra Ballon, Siren
Aruna Antonella Handa composer & lead vocals, Siren
Caitlin Holland Siren
Lindsay MacDonald Siren
Kristian Podlacha keys, piano
Raphael Roter drums
Jennifer Wakefield Siren on leave

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Future Sood Salon 3 Sponsors


sine qua non

Future Sood Salon 3 Sponsors


sine qua non

SPONSORS AND PARTNERS VOYAGE TO ANTHROPOCENE 3

 
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Future Food Salons Past


2011-2015
Toronto, NY, Austin, Montreal

Future Food Salons Past


2011-2015
Toronto, NY, Austin, Montreal

The Future Food SalonS explore AND CELEBRATE what we will be eating in the future.

 

Please visit the Eating Innovation page as well. Eating Innovation is conceived as a series of colloquia in which themes raised in future food salons can be treated with more time and depth.

FUTURE FOOD SALONS PAST
Toronto: Centre for Social Innovation (2011) Gallery 345 (2013)
New York: Centre for Social Innovation NY (2013) The Explorers Club (2015)
Austin: Brazos Hall (2014)
Montreal: Insectarium / Botanical Gardens (2014)

 

FUTURE FOOD BANQUETS + RELATED EVENTS
Toronto: Victory Café Bugs & Beer, CSI Annex: Taste Lab: crickets (2013)
Montreal: Insectarium / Botanical Gardens Big Bang Bug Banquet (2014)
New York: The Explorers Club Banquet of Bugs (2015)

 

Crickets & cocktails
new york banquet of bugs

NEW YORK
NOV 21, 2015
Slides

ALIMENTARY INITIATIVES
NY ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
THE EXPLORERS CLUB
THE METROPOLITAN SOCIETY OF NATURAL HISTORIANS

The Explorers Club, UES, Manhattan
Photographer: Shifaan Thowfeequ

 
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crickets on the tip of your tongue
NEW YORK
AUG 14, 2013
Slides & Stills

ALIMENTARY INITIATIVES  &
CULTURE OF CITIES CENTRE

Centre for Social Innovation Starrett-Lehigh
Chelsea, Manhattan
Photographers: Ambitious City, Han-Studio.

 
 
 
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crickets on the tip of your tongue
NEW YORK
AUG 14, 2013
VIDEO

ALIMENTARY INITIATIVES  &
CULTURE OF CITIES CENTRE

Centre for Social Innovation Starrett-Lehigh
Chelsea, Manhattan
Videographer: Han-Studio.

 

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2013-15 Series


Crickets

2013-15 Series


Crickets

The 2013-15 Cricket Series
The 2013-15 series was all about eating crickets. Crickets are more efficient to raise than traditional livestock as their cultivation requires less water, less land and less feed than traditional livestock, and their cultivation also produces less waste. They arenutritious with comparable protein to beef and chicken, with heart-healthy fats, and low cholesterol. We have found them to be an exceedingly versatile food ingredient. Some of our sponsors in this series are making a business case for eating crickets right now in the present.

The Salonnières
The Future Food Salon 2 series was co-hosted by Dr. Elke Grenzer, Director of the Culture of Cities Centre and by Dr. Aruna Antonella Handa, the founder of the series.

Eating Innovation: the art, culture, science and business of entomophagy
This three day conference took place at Montreal's Insectarium in the Space for Life complex, August 26-28. The conference was organized by Alimentary Initiatives and the members of the Future Food Salon in collaboration with the Montreal Insectarium. There were just over 100 delegates who participated in plenary sessions and panels by day, and feasted on insects by night. The Montreal Future Food Salon and the Discovery Gallery were open to the general public, and the Big Bang Bug Banquet closed the conference with a nine course edible bug banquet, with each course inspired by one of the nine planets of our solar system. Dr. Aruna Antonella Handa and Dr. Elke Grenzer were the conference conveners. The conference program is available online here.

Partners and Sponsors
Chapul makes a high protein cricket-based bar and participated in the New York and Austin Salons and Big Cricket Farms, based in Ohio, is the first American farm exclusively dedicated to cultivating food grade crickets for wholesale and retail markets. Big Cricket Farms supplied the Montreal Salon and debuted their product at the Eating Innovation conference, hosted by the Future Food Salon Group in collaboration with the Space for Life Montreal Insectarium. Jakub Dzamba and his Third Millennium Farming conducts research into making cricket farming more efficient in the urban setting.  Gourmex Inc and uKa protein are Montreal based edible insect companies, who showcased their products at the Salon and Discovery Gallery.

Entomophagy expert Dave Gracer of Small Stock Foods (Rhode Island), and entomologists Marianne Shockley (Georgia) and Lou Sorkin participated in an Entomophagy Panel at our New York Salon, and all three also spoke at the Eating Innovation conference, Aug 26-28/2014 in Montreal. Both Dave Gracer and Lou Sorkin are members of the Future Food Salon Group.

Tiny Farms from Silicon Valley, California hosted one of the plenary sessions at the Eating Innovation conference. They are also conducting research into efficient methods of farming edible insects.

Discovery Gallery - edible insect art & commerce
The Discovery Gallery was hosted in the Reception Hall of the Botanical Gardens, at Space for Life,  in Montreal during the Eating Innovation Conference August 26-28, 2014. Curated by Future Food Salon Group member, artist Han Zhang, the Discovery Gallery featured art and commerce related to edible insects. Entrance was free.

Artists, Photographers & Videographers
Future Food Salon Group member, Han Zhang,  partnered with artists Dominique Ferraton and Marjan Verstappen, in the Discovery Gallery as well as at the Montreal Salon.

Like Manna from Heaven, a piece created by Han Zhang and Helen Yung, for the series, is composed of Chinese poems about food, written in Chinese characters on rice paper from which baskets were cut and hung. Talented and dedicated photographers and videographers, Han ZhangMichal Labik and Michael Cumming of Ambitious City have also contributed to the series. In Austin, Hayley Gillespie of Art.Science.Gallery curated a collection of insect-inspired art for the Austin salon.

Chefs & Cooks
Without chefs, the Future Food Salons are nothing. We work with intrepid and talented chefs, bakers, chocolatiers and cooks. Future Food Salon Group member and Future Food Salon veteran Cookie Martinez has cooked and baked for the Toronto, New York, and Montreal Salons in this series, as well as for the Big Bang Bug Banquet and the Beer & Bugs event. In Montreal, she was joined by Montreal-based chefs from Cook Caravan, David Ali Garcia, and Gourmex inc. with contributions from France-based Jimini's and Micronutris, and Ohio based Big Cricket Farms.

In Austin, chefs Sonya Cote of Eden East, Imani Dabney and Michael Guidry and the chefs from Texas-based How Do You Roll created bug canapés for the Austin Salon.  Chef Daniel Holloway of Urban Acorn Catering made the cricket canapés for our Toronto Salon. In addition to Cookie Martinez who made savoury canapés, Baker Emily Breedlove of Texas made chocolate chirp cookies, and chocolatier Fat Turkey Chocolate Company made cricket based chocolates for the Manhattan Salon.

Vino
Texas Mead Works meads were sampled in New York, courtesy of Little Herds, and Rosewood Estates Winery provided mead for the Toronto Salon. Treaty Oak Distilling and Lagunitas Brewing Company  and Brazos Hall provided libations in Austin.

Volunteers & Staff
The Salons have benefited from the hard work of a number of graduate students, friends, and colleagues who have donated some volunteer time to the Salons. We are grateful to André Luis Marin, Meredith Marin, Bethany Nelson, Marjan Verstappen , Kai Fai Ho, Melina Giannelia, and Stefka Lubenova. We are grateful to the volunteers and staff at the Centre for Social Innovation-Starrett Lehigh, in Manhattan and Gallery 345 in Toronto and to the Little Herd volunteers in Austin. Translators and editors for the conference program included Veronica Sanz, Chanel Boucher, and Eric Bescak.

Sound & Visual
Atomic Picnic provided stellar sound and visual support for the Austin Salon.